45 BEST Tips on How to Hold a Baby (C Section)

William T Johnson Dec 24, 2022
0 People Read
in a hospital two surgeons dressed in green clothes make a caesarean section and pull the baby out of the woman's belly
Table of Contents
  1. My Sister's Scar from her Cesarean Section (C Section) literally BURSTED!
  2. What do most people call a Cesarean Section (C Section)?
  3. Is a Cesarean Section (C Section) a minor or major surgery?
  4. How long does a Cesarean take?
  5. How painful is C Section?
  6. What a C Section scar looks like?
  7. Do C sections scars go away?
  8. Can a Caesarean Section scar break and what does it mean?
  9. How does it feel when your Caesarean Section scar bursts?
  10. What is not allowed after C-section?
  11. What to Eat After A C-Section?
  12. Read NOW also 55 BEST Tips on How to Hold a Baby (During the Day)
  13. How Long Does It Take to Recover From a C-Section?
  14. When can I pickup my toddler after C-section?
  15. Read NOW also 65 BEST Tips on How to Hold a Baby (Feeding)
  16. Read NOW also 49 BEST Tips on How to Hold a Baby (Colic No Flat Head)
  17. Cesarean Sections in a nutshell
  18. My sister was overcome with joy when she first leaned over the cradle and suddenly...
  19. Cheer up!
  20. I’d love to hear from You! And learn from Your experiences!!
  21. Read NOW also 65 BEST Tips on How to Hold a Baby (Feeding)
  22. Read NOW also 45 BEST Tips on How to Hold a Baby (In Sleep)
  23. Read NOW also 33 BEST Tips on How to Hold a Baby (In Transport)
  24. Read NOW also 69 Tips When Stop Swaddling a Baby (Facts)
  25. Read NOW also 59 BEST Tips on How to Hold a Baby (CRISIS Situations)
  26. Read NOW also 49 BEST Tips on How to Hold a Baby (On The Plane)
  27. Read NOW also 55 BEST Tips on How to Hold a Baby (During the Day)
  28. Read NOW also 49 BEST Tips on How to Hold a Baby (Colic No Flat Head)
  29. Read NOW also 33 BEST Tips on How to Hold a Baby (Gassy Reflux)
  30. Please note

My Sister's Scar from her Cesarean Section (C Section) literally BURSTED!

My sister's moment of joy quickly transformed into a nightmarish scene when she attempted to lift her newborn twins.

The ambitious mother was immediately frozen with pain, as the scar from her C Section (Cesarean Section) bursted and left behind an agonizing reminder that nothing can be taken lightly after major surgery.

Though things could have ended horribly wrong in those fragile moments, luckily they didn't - but it still took three times longer for my Sister to get back on track due to this unexpected event.

fresh iodine-disinfected scar on the belly of a young mother after caesarean section with clamps protecting against tearing

Despite having missed out on treasured first memories with the babies, there is much we all can take away here today: seek proper medical advice before embarking onto any new journey!

What do most people call a Cesarean Section (C Section)?

(1/45) Most people commonly refer to a Cesarean Section (C Section) as a “C-section”, or an operation that involves the surgical delivery of a Baby through an incision in the mother’s abdomen and uterus.

The Cesarean Section procedure has been around for thousands of years and is one of the oldest known surgical procedures. It was first performed by Hippocrates, the founding father of modern medicine, over 2000 years ago.

However, it didn't become popular until the late 19th century when advances in anesthesia, antiseptic practices and antibiotics made operations safer.

two surgeons in the hospital in green coats make a caesarean section to get the baby out of the belly of a young mother

(2/45) The procedure is usually recommended when vaginal delivery is deemed too risky due to complications such as preeclampsia, fetal distress or umbilical cord prolapse. It may also be recommended if the Baby is in a breech position, or if labor isn't progressing normally.

(3/45) A C-section typically lasts between 30-90 minutes and involves making an incision just below the navel so that the Baby can be removed safely from the mother's womb. Afterward, stitches will be used to close up the incision before being covered with sterile dressings and bandaging material.

Once delivered via C-section, mothers are usually able to hold their babies within minutes after birth - although how much time passes will depend on how long it takes for them to recover from surgery.

(4/45) Overall, a Cesarean Section is considered very safe for both mother and Baby - with most hospitals successfully delivering over 95% of babies who required Cesarean Procedures without any problems occurring during or after surgery.

Therefore it can be said that C-sections have proved invaluable in allowing many women to safely deliver their little ones into this world!

Is a Cesarean Section (C Section) a minor or major surgery?

(5/45) A Cesarean Section (C Section) is a major surgery, although it typically isn’t as complex or invasive as other major surgeries. The procedure requires an incision to be made through the abdominal wall and uterus to deliver the Baby, the mother typically being given an epidural beforehand to numb any pain.

two surgeons, one wearing a red cap and one wearing a blue one, perform a caesarean section to deliver the baby

The recovery time for this procedure is usually much longer than a typical vaginal delivery - with some mothers taking up to six weeks before they can resume their normal activities.

(6/45) The procedure may also have additional risks associated with it such as infection, blood clots, excessive bleeding or injury to internal organs and surrounding tissue.

Post-operative complications like these are more common when C Sections are performed outside of medically indicated situations or when they are done too quickly by medical practitioners who aren't trained in how to perform them properly.

For this reason, it's always important for potential mothers considering undergoing a Cesarean section to seek out a qualified doctor and only proceed with the procedure if there is a clear medical need for it.

(7/45) Overall, C Sections should not be considered ‘minor’ surgeries due to the significant recovery time that usually follows them and how complex they can become in certain cases. While there are certain benefits associated with C Sections that make them an attractive option for some women, there’s no denying how important it is for potential patients to do their research into how the process works and what possible risks come along with it before undergoing any form of surgical delivery.

How long does a Cesarean take?

(8/45) A Cesarean Section (C-Section) typically takes between 30-90 minutes, depending on how complicated the procedure is. A standard C-section involves making an incision just below the navel so that the Baby can be removed safely from the mother's womb. This incision will then be closed with stitches, covered in sterile dressings and bandaging material before being permitted to hold their Baby within minutes after birth.

However, how fast a patient recovers from surgery and how soon they can hold their Baby depends on how long it takes for them to heal from the C-Section. Generally speaking though, mothers are usually able to start holding their newborns shortly after delivery - though this number may vary depending upon each individual case.

baby after being removed from mother's belly by caesarean section, solemn moment, emotional

How painful is C Section?

(9/45) A Cesarean Section (C-Section) can be a painful experience, with some women reporting the incision site being especially tender and uncomfortable.

The pain level during a C-Section will vary greatly depending upon how complicated the procedure is and how well the patient responds to anaesthesia.

Most patients are given an epidural or spinal block beforehand in order to numb them from feeling any pain throughout their surgery but as with any operation there is always a certain amount of discomfort that comes afterwards.

(10/45) Once surgery has been completed, most women report experiencing mild to moderate levels of post-operative pain that can last anywhere between three days up to several weeks after delivery. To help relieve this pain many doctors prescribe over-the-counter medications such as ibuprofen or Tylenol combined with prescription narcotics like codeine if needed.

Additionally, cold packs may also be used at incision sites in order to reduce swelling and provide further analgesic relief for C Section mothers once they're home from hospital. In addition, gentle exercise can help speed up recovery time by increasing oxygen flow and strengthening abdominal muscles - although how much activity is allowed will depend on how comfortable the mother feels afterward as every woman's situation is different.

the baby tightly wrapped in a blanket sleeps soundly, fully innocent and happy

(11/45) Overall, how much pain and how quickly a mother recovers after delivery varies greatly depending upon how complex the procedure was, how well they responded to anaesthesia, how quickly they heal from it and how long it takes for their body to return to its normal state.

What a C Section scar looks like?

(12/45) A Cesarean Section, or C-Section, commonly involves a surgical incision being made within the lower abdomen in order to deliver the Baby. Depending on how complicated the procedure is, this incision can vary in size and length and typically heals up with time.

(13/45) Typically speaking, C Section scars are usually thin, linear lines that are several inches in length. The scar itself will be red or pink in colour at first but as it begins to heal it will fade over time until eventually becoming almost completely unnoticeable. In some cases however, depending upon how complex the operation was, C-Section scars can become wider due to swelling and inflammation caused by infection or tissue damage.

a fresh, iodine-disinfected scar from a caesarean section right after the baby was removed from the mother's womb

(14/45) Besides looking different from regular nine months pregnancy scars - which tend to take longer for them to heal - there is no scientific evidence that suggests that Cesarean Section scars have any effects on a woman's fertility or her ability to carry another Child later down the line.

In fact, many women who have undergone a C Section are able to go on and give birth naturally for their next pregnancy if they wish too; provided there is no medical reason preventing them from doing so.

(15/45) C-Section scar healing times also vary depending upon how well a patient takes care of herself while recovering from surgery as well as how quickly her body responds to the procedure itself.

Generally speaking though, most patients report that their scars begin fading and lightening up within 6-12 weeks postpartum - although how long it takes for them to completely disappear varies greatly between individuals.

a mother lovingly holds a newly born baby, and a fascinated father full of happiness stands next to it

(16/45) When it comes to how painful C Section scars may be during healing process - typically speaking they shouldn't be too bothersome as long as you keep your wound clean and dry while avoiding activities that could irritate the scar such as heavy lifting or exercising without proper support garments like abdominal binders.

Keeping abreast with your doctor’s advice regarding how best you can look after yourself throughout your recovery period should also help keep discomfort levels low when it comes to dealing with C-Section scarring and healing timescales afterwards.

Do C sections scars go away?

(17/45) In most cases, a Cesarean Section (C-Section) scar will eventually fade and become almost completely unnoticeable over time. Generally speaking, C-Section scars are usually thin, linear lines that are several inches in length and they typically start to heal within 6-12 weeks of the procedure.

an old healed caesarean scar in a realistic view without any embellishments

(18/45) However, how quickly a C Section scar fades can depend upon how well the patient takes care of herself during recovery as well as how quickly her body responds to the procedure itself.

Keeping your wound clean and dry while avoiding activities that could irritate the scar such as heavy lifting or exercising without proper support garments like abdominal binders is essential for ensuring minimal levels of discomfort throughout your healing process.

Additionally, taking medications prescribed by your doctor such as ibuprofen or Tylenol combined with prescription narcotics if needed can also help aid in providing relief from any postpartum pain you may feel at incision sites.

(19/45) Overall there is no scientific evidence that suggests that Cesarean Section scars have any effects on a woman’s fertility or her ability to carry another Child later down the line - provided there is no medical reason preventing them from doing so.

a healed scar on the mother's belly after a caesarean section, with cheerful inscriptions betraying the joy of having a child

With correct care taken during recovery period and keeping abreast with your doctor’s advice, C-Section scars should eventually fade and become almost completely unnoticeable over time.

Can a Caesarean Section scar break and what does it mean?

(20/45) A Cesarean Section (C-Section) scar can break, but this is rare. While C-Section scars are typically thin, linear lines that are several inches in length and they normally heal within 6-12 weeks of the procedure, sometimes a scar will break open before it is completely healed. This is most likely caused by improper wound care or excessive physical activity too soon after the operation.

(21/45) The first thing to do if a C-Section scar breaks open is to seek medical attention right away. It's important to follow all doctor's orders when it comes to how to properly look after the wound and how best to keep it clean while healing.

The doctor may recommend antibiotics or other medications as well as provide advice on how to prevent further injury or infection from occurring at the site of the wound.

fresh scar

(22/45) It's also important not to engage in strenuous activity such as heavy lifting or strenuous exercise for at least six weeks after C-Section surgery as these activities can cause further strain and damage on an already weakened area which could lead to rupture of the scar tissue.

Additionally, it's essential for women who have undergone a C section to wear supportive garments such as an abdominal binder in order to help properly support their back and abdomen during recovery period which should help reduce any pain or discomfort that may be felt at incision sites.

(23/45) Overall, while a broken Cesarean Section scar may not be ideal - with proper care taken during recovery period and keeping abreast with your doctor’s advice - most patients report that their scars begin fading and lightening up within 6-12 weeks postpartum even with minor injuries sustained along their healing process which are ultimately just part of their birth story!

How does it feel when your Caesarean Section scar bursts?

(24/45) When a Cesarean Section scar bursts open prematurely, it can be a very uncomfortable and distressing experience. Depending on how severe the rupture is, it can cause varying levels of pain at the site of the incision which may include sharp stings and throbbing sensations.

a group of surgeons work to stop the bleeding from an open wound after the stitches have been torn off

This discomfort can range from mild to more severe cases depending on how deep the wound is, how much tension was applied to the affected area as well as how quickly medical attention was sought out.

(25/45) In more severe cases that involve extensive tearing or gaping wounds, it is common for patients to experience a significant amount of bleeding along with an increased level of swelling at the affected area.

Other symptoms such as bruising, redness and infection at the site may also present themselves in these cases due to potential exposure to bacteria in the environment.

(26/45) Typically speaking, if a Cesarean Section scar bursts open prior to its healing period being completed (which normally takes 6-12 weeks) then there will be an increased risk of further complications including longer recovery times with higher risks for infections and other postpartum issues such as blood clots or uterine bleeding.

It is important to seek medical attention immediately in order to properly assess any potential damage that has occurred and get proper treatment right away.

a happy, full of life baby in the prone position looks interesting from under the blanket under which he was hiding for fun

(27/45) At this point your doctor may recommend antibiotics or other medications as well as provide advice on how best to keep wound clean while healing and how best to prevent further injury or infection from occurring at site of rupture.

Additionally, it's essential for women who have undergone C-section surgery not to engage in any strenuous activity such as heavy lifting or vigorous exercise for at least six weeks after procedure in order to reduce any strain on already weakened area which could lead to even further damage of ruptured Cesarean Section scar tissue.

(28/45) Overall it is crucial for those who have experienced a Cesarean Section scar rupture prior completion of its healing period that they follow their doctor's orders closely in terms of how best care for their wound and how best prevent any further injury or infection from occurring during recovery period so that they can fully reap benefits associated with Cesarean Section operation without fear of long term complications related scarring and/or infections down line.

Can you hold a Baby after C Section?

(29/45) Yes, you can hold a Baby after a C-section. It is important to know that the amount of time one should wait before holding their newborn depends on individual circumstances as well as how the mother is feeling. Generally speaking, the mother and Baby can be brought together shortly after delivery or once the anesthesia has completely worn off.

mother holds baby after caesarean section and manages

(30/45) When it comes to holding and caring for a Baby after a C-section, it is important to take things slow and steady. To start, it is best to use a semi-reclined nursing position for breastfeeding with plenty of pillows for support. This will help keep pressure off of the wound area and keep both mother and Baby comfortable during feedings.

In addition, when picking up or carrying your Baby, always ensure that you are crouching down at their level instead of bending over them; this will reduce stress on your lower abdominal region where your incision is located. For additional support, some women find that wearing an abdominal binder helps relieve any pain associated with moving around post-surgery.

(31/45) Once you have gotten comfortable with feeding positions then you can slowly advance into other holds such as cradling or even trying out different types of babies carriers if appropriate!

It often takes several weeks before a new mom begins feeling confident enough in her ability to care for her infant; so taking things step by step while listening to your body's cues is essential in order to avoid any potential complications or risks associated with holding a newborn too soon after delivery.

(32/45) Overall, being able to hold your little bundle of joy shortly after birth is an incredibly special experience which every parent deserves! By taking the proper precautions and understanding how your body may react during this period of recovery, you can ensure that both you and your little one remain safe throughout this unique journey!

What is not allowed after C-section?

(33/45) It's important to avoid any activity that could put strain on your incision site or cause further damage while you are recovering from your cesarean section. This includes lifting objects heavier than your Baby or engaging in strenuous activity such as running or weightlifting until cleared by your doctor.

a happy baby hides under the covers and plays with you

(34/45) Additionally, alcohol consumption should be avoided until you have fully recovered from the surgery as alcohol can interfere with medications used during the healing process after delivery.

What to Eat After A C-Section?

(35/45) It's important to maintain a healthy diet after having a cesarean section in order to heal properly. Foods that are rich in nutrients such as fruits, vegetables, lean proteins and whole grains are good choices for post-delivery meals.

Please read on

but in a separate window

See NOW also comprehensive

Read NOW also 55 BEST Tips on How to Hold a Baby (During the Day)

>> click NOW Here to read it <<

For your convenience, it opens in a new window.

Thank you! It is nice to prepare HELPFUL information for You!

(36/45) Eating smaller meals more frequently throughout the day can also help with digestion, which can be uncomfortable following surgery.

eat salads that you make yourself, not saving on green fresh products

(37/45) Avoiding caffeine, processed foods and sugary beverages can also help reduce inflammation and aid in healing.

How Long Does It Take to Recover From a C-Section?

(38/45) Recovery from a cesarean section usually takes between two and four weeks. During this time, it is important to take extra care of your body as it heals from the surgery. This includes getting enough rest and taking medication as prescribed by your doctor.

You should also limit physical activity and avoid lifting anything heavier than your Baby during the first few weeks of recovery.

When can I pickup my toddler after C-section?

(39/45) When deciding when to pick up your toddler after a C-section, it is important to take into consideration how long it typically takes for the body to heal from the procedure. Generally speaking, recovery from a C-section can take anywhere from two to four weeks depending on how involved the surgery was.

During this time, it is essential that you get plenty of rest and avoid lifting anything heavier than your Baby in order to give your incision the best chance at healing properly.

mother in a maternity white hat holding a newborn baby on

(40/45) Once you have reached the two-week mark, you may be able to start picking up and carrying your toddler with more confidence; however, how quickly you are able to do so will depend on how comfortable you feel in doing so.

If at any point during this process you experience pain or discomfort associated with picking up your Child then it is important to stop and rest until the feeling subsides.

Additionally, wearing an abdominal binder while carrying around your toddler can provide extra support and help reduce any pain associated with movement.

Please read on

but in a separate window

See NOW also comprehensive

Read NOW also 65 BEST Tips on How to Hold a Baby (Feeding)

>> click NOW Here to read it <<

For your convenience, it opens in a new window.

Thank you! It is nice to prepare HELPFUL information for You!

(41/45) You should also consider how physically demanding it can be caring for a toddler following a C-section. This includes activities such as playing games, running around outside or even just getting dressed each morning!

Depending on how physically taxing these tasks are for you, you may need extra support during this period of postpartum recovery.

For example, if possible enlisting family or friends who can come over and help out with Childcare duties can make life much easier!

(42/45) In general, when considering when it’s safe for you to lift your toddler after a cesarean section there are many factors that must be taken into account including how long recovery typically takes, how comfortable you feel while performing certain tasks and how much physical demand they require of your body.

defenseless happy baby in a hat with bunny ears lies under a crocheted blanket looking curiously

Ultimately, listening closely to what your body needs during this time is key so that both mother and Child remain safe throughout their postpartum journey!

How long after C Section can you hold a Baby?

(43/45) The answer to the question of how long after a c-section one can hold a Baby is dependent on individual circumstances and how the mother is feeling. Generally speaking, most mothers are able to bring their Baby close shortly after delivery, or once the anesthesia has completely worn off.

It should be noted that taking it slow and steady is essential when caring for a newborn right after giving birth; this means finding comfortable positions for both mother and Baby while breastfeeding, such as semi-reclined nursing positions with plenty of pillows for support.

Please read on

but in a separate window

See NOW also comprehensive

Read NOW also 49 BEST Tips on How to Hold a Baby (Colic No Flat Head)

>> click NOW Here to read it <<

For your convenience, it opens in a new window.

Thank you! It is nice to prepare HELPFUL information for You!

Additionally, when picking up or carrying your Child, always ensure you are crouching down at their level instead of bending over them in order to reduce stress on the incision area.

(44/45) Some women may experience slight discomfort during the recovery period, so wearing an abdominal binder can help provide additional support when walking around or performing other activities.

Once comfortable with feeding positions, then parents can move onto trying out different types of holding positions such as cradling or using various forms of carriers that best fit their needs.

(45/45) However, patience is key during this period as it often takes several weeks before a new mom begins feeling confident enough in her own ability to care for her infant; by listening to your body's cues and taking things step by step, parents can help ensure maximum safety while allowing them to enjoy the momentous occasion of being able to hold their little bundle of joy!

Cesarean Sections in a nutshell

Cesarean Sections, or C-sections, are a common form of Childbirth when a Baby is delivered through an incision in the mother's uterus.

Although this type of delivery has become increasingly popular in recent years, it is still major surgery and there are certain precautions that must be taken post-delivery for a successful recovery.

A cesarean section is major surgery that requires special attention during recovery in order for the mother’s body to heal properly.

The most important things for young mothers to remember are taking extra care of their bodies during the healing period by getting plenty of rest, eating nutritious food and avoiding heavy physical activity or alcohol consumption until cleared by their doctor.

By following these tips, mothers will be back on their feet soon after delivering their babies!

My sister was overcome with joy when she first leaned over the cradle and suddenly...

My Sister was overcome with joy when she first leaned over the cradle to lift her twins.

my sister after cesarean section tired but happy after all

But as soon as they were in her arms, a sharp pain raced across her abdomen - an unwelcome reminder of the Caesarean Section scar that had yet to fully heal and almost cost my sister those beautiful first moments with her beloved newborns.

It's such a cruel story. If only there was a way to avoid this risk - that is why I described all this above.

Cheer up!

I’d love to hear from You! And learn from Your experiences!!

Please send me a message on whatever You would like to share please!

It is an honour to have a chance to be in contact with You and learn from YOUR experiences!!

Read Also prepared specially for You:

Read NOW also 65 BEST Tips on How to Hold a Baby (Feeding)

>> click NOW Here to read it <<

Read NOW also 45 BEST Tips on How to Hold a Baby (In Sleep)

>> click NOW Here to read it <<

Read NOW also 33 BEST Tips on How to Hold a Baby (In Transport)

>> click NOW Here to read it <<

Read NOW also 69 Tips When Stop Swaddling a Baby (Facts)

>> click NOW Here to read it <<

Read NOW also 59 BEST Tips on How to Hold a Baby (CRISIS Situations)

>> click NOW Here to read it <<

Read NOW also 49 BEST Tips on How to Hold a Baby (On The Plane)

>> click NOW Here to read it <<

Read NOW also 55 BEST Tips on How to Hold a Baby (During the Day)

>> click NOW Here to read it <<

Read NOW also 49 BEST Tips on How to Hold a Baby (Colic No Flat Head)

>> click NOW Here to read it <<

Read NOW also 33 BEST Tips on How to Hold a Baby (Gassy Reflux)

>> click NOW Here to read it <<

Please note

Kew Media Site is an invaluable resource, but when it comes to matters of health, always consult with a trained medical professional – never rely solely on digital information. Taking into account your individual situation will help you make the best decisions for your own wellbeing.

Kew Media Site serves as an informative resource, but should never be used to diagnose or treat a medical condition.

When it comes to your health, always consult with a qualified doctor for the best advice and care tailored specifically for you!

Kew Media Site and the materials and information it contains are not intended to, and do not constitute, medical or other health advice or diagnosis and should not be used as such.

You should always consult with a qualified physician or health professional about your specific circumstances.

Table of Contents
  1. My Sister's Scar from her Cesarean Section (C Section) literally BURSTED!
  2. What do most people call a Cesarean Section (C Section)?
  3. Is a Cesarean Section (C Section) a minor or major surgery?
  4. How long does a Cesarean take?
  5. How painful is C Section?
  6. What a C Section scar looks like?
  7. Do C sections scars go away?
  8. Can a Caesarean Section scar break and what does it mean?
  9. How does it feel when your Caesarean Section scar bursts?
  10. What is not allowed after C-section?
  11. What to Eat After A C-Section?
  12. Read NOW also 55 BEST Tips on How to Hold a Baby (During the Day)
  13. How Long Does It Take to Recover From a C-Section?
  14. When can I pickup my toddler after C-section?
  15. Read NOW also 65 BEST Tips on How to Hold a Baby (Feeding)
  16. Read NOW also 49 BEST Tips on How to Hold a Baby (Colic No Flat Head)
  17. Cesarean Sections in a nutshell
  18. My sister was overcome with joy when she first leaned over the cradle and suddenly...
  19. Cheer up!
  20. I’d love to hear from You! And learn from Your experiences!!
  21. Read NOW also 65 BEST Tips on How to Hold a Baby (Feeding)
  22. Read NOW also 45 BEST Tips on How to Hold a Baby (In Sleep)
  23. Read NOW also 33 BEST Tips on How to Hold a Baby (In Transport)
  24. Read NOW also 69 Tips When Stop Swaddling a Baby (Facts)
  25. Read NOW also 59 BEST Tips on How to Hold a Baby (CRISIS Situations)
  26. Read NOW also 49 BEST Tips on How to Hold a Baby (On The Plane)
  27. Read NOW also 55 BEST Tips on How to Hold a Baby (During the Day)
  28. Read NOW also 49 BEST Tips on How to Hold a Baby (Colic No Flat Head)
  29. Read NOW also 33 BEST Tips on How to Hold a Baby (Gassy Reflux)
  30. Please note